How Search Rank and Search Placement Are Inherited

The same rules apply determining the values for search rank or search placement attributes for a product:

  1. A category defines the search rank or placement for all products assigned to this category or assigned to any subcategory of the category. All keyword searches for online content include the root category and all products default to the root category value if they don't have an individual or category value assigned. If a product is in a subcategory of an offline category, it isn't included in keyword search or category refinement.
  2. A subcategory value overrides the search rank or placement value inherited from its parent category.
  3. A product can override the search rank or placement inherited from any of its categories. A product can define its own search rank or placement, and inherit search ranks or search placements from one or multiple categories it's assigned to.

If a product inherits search rank or placement from multiple categories, the following rules apply to resolve this conflict:

  1. If the product defines a search rank or placement, then the product value takes precedence over any value inherited from a category.
  2. If the product doesn't define a search rank or placement, then the search rank or placement of any product category below the current refinement category is used.

Because a product might be assigned to multiple categories below the current refinement category, the following rules apply to break ties:

  1. Rank or placement defined at the deepest category in the refinement tree is used.
  2. If a different rank or placement is defined for multiple categories at the same level in the refinement tree, then the best rank or placement is used.
  3. The best rank or placement depends on the sorting direction; it is the highest value if direction is descending, and the lowest if direction is ascending. For example, if the sort direction is descending and the two available values are three and five, then five is used. If the sort direction is ascending, then three is used.

For variants and product sets, the following rules apply:

  1. Variants can define their own search rank or placement. If they do not, they inherit the search rank or placement defined for the master product.
  2. If neither variant nor master defines a search rank or placement, the variant is directly assigned to a category, and appears in the search result as an individual product, then the variant inherits search rank or placement from the category.
  3. If neither variant nor master defines a search rank or placement, and the variant is assigned to a category via its master product, then the variant inherits search rank or placement from the master product category, as defined above for normal products.

Search Inheritance Example